nitratediva:

Jane Russell in Son of Paleface (1952).

nitratediva:

Jane Russell in Son of Paleface (1952).

fawnvelveteen:

Filipino leader Manuel L. Quezon poses with Marlene Dietrich on the set of The Devil is a Woman directed by Josef Von Sternberg, 1935

fawnvelveteen:

Filipino leader Manuel L. Quezon poses with Marlene Dietrich on the set of The Devil is a Woman directed by Josef Von Sternberg, 1935

(via labelleotero)

sydneyflapper:

1920s film magazines - some of the big ones

(via themissroya)

274 notes

Rita Hayworth │Affair in Trinidad, 1952

Rita Hayworth │Affair in Trinidad, 1952

(Source: ritahayworthdaily, via woman-unkind)


"She sure registered on that screen. The minute the camera turned on her she became this incredible creature, and she was absolutely dazzling. She was-there’s no question about that. During our scenes she’d look at my forehead instead of my eyes. At the end of a take, she’d look to her coach for approval. If the headshake was no, she’d insist on another take. A scene often went to fifteen or more takes. Despite this I couldn’t dislike Marilyn. She had no meanness in her- no bitchery. She just had to concentrate on herself and the people who were there only for her… Fifty years on, we’re still watching her movies and talking about her. That’s not a dumb woman- trust me. “ —Lauren Bacall“Her searches after knowledge were arbitrary and without context. It was as if she were shining a small flashlight of curiosity into the dark room of the world.”  ― Gloria Steinem”Marilyn is a dreamy girl. She’s the kind who’s liable to show up with one red shoe and one black shoe. “ —Jane Russell ”She’d come out of our apartment in a shleppy old coat, looking like my maid, and all the people would push her aside to get my autograph. She loved it.”— Shelley Winters“She returns to us as the camera’s gift, the treasure of remembrance. She returns in echoes of dark and light, in a truth only the image can yield, the shutter’s eye which sees and tells. The image of Marilyn haunts and flowers from generation to generation. There are not many of her kind. She was born to film, that illusion transforming life into the reality of art.” —Sam ShawShe seemed to have a kind of unconscious glow about her physical self that was innocent, like a child. When she posed nude, it was ‘Gee, I arn kind of, you know, sort of dishy,’ like she enjoyed it without being egotistical.” —Elizabeth Taylor”She’s scared and unsure of herself. I found myself wishing that I were a psychoanalyst and she were my patient. It might be that I couldn’t have helped her, but she would have looked lovelv on a couch. “ Billy Wilder”When you look at Marilyn on the screen, you don’t want anything bad to happen to her. You really care that she should be all right…happy.” —Natalie Wood”I never worked with Marilyn Monroe, but if she’d lived, I think she would have been all right. She would have been President of the United States. “ —Walter Matthau”She was not the usual movie idol. There was something democratic about her. She was the type who would join in and wash up the supper dishes even if you didn’t ask her.” —Carl Sandburg”Marilyn was an incredible person to act with…the most marvelous I ever worked with, and I have been working for 29 years.” —Montgomery Clift”When she’s there, she’s there. All of her is there! She’s there to work. “—Clark Gable”Still she hangs like a bat in the heads of the men who met her, and none of us will ever forget her. “— Sammy Davis, Jr. ”Marilyn’s need to be desired was so great that she could make love to a camera. Because of this, her lust aroused lust in audiences, sometimes even among women. There was nothing subtle about it. She was no tease. She was prepared, and even eager, to give what she offered. “ —William Manchester”Do you remember when Marilyn Monroe died? Everybody stopped work, and you could see all that day the same expressions on their faces, the same thought: ‘How can a girl with success, fame, youth, money, beauty … how could she kill herself?’ Nobody could understand it because those are the things that everybody wants, and they can’t believe that life wasn’t important to Marilyn Monroe, or that her life was elsewhere. “ —Marlon Brando”It may sound peculiar to say so, because she is no longer with us, but we were very close. Once when we were doing that picture together, I got a call on the set: my younger daughter had had a fall. I ran home and the one person to call was Marilyn. She did an awful lot to boost things up for movies when everything was at a low state; there’ll never be anyone like her for looks, for attitude, for all of it. “— Betty GrableNorma Jeane Baker / Marilyn Monroe ( June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962 )
"She sure registered on that screen. The minute the camera turned on her she became this incredible creature, and she was absolutely dazzling. She was-there’s no question about that. During our scenes she’d look at my forehead instead of my eyes. At the end of a take, she’d look to her coach for approval. If the headshake was no, she’d insist on another take. A scene often went to fifteen or more takes. Despite this I couldn’t dislike Marilyn. She had no meanness in her- no bitchery. She just had to concentrate on herself and the people who were there only for her… Fifty years on, we’re still watching her movies and talking about her. That’s not a dumb woman- trust me.—Lauren Bacall

“Her searches after knowledge were arbitrary and without context. It was as if she were shining a small flashlight of curiosity into the dark room of the world.” ― Gloria Steinem

”Marilyn is a dreamy girl. She’s the kind who’s liable to show up with one red shoe and one black shoe. “ —Jane Russell

”She’d come out of our apartment in a shleppy old coat, looking like my maid, and all the people would push her aside to get my autograph. She loved it.”— Shelley Winters

“She returns to us as the camera’s gift, the treasure of remembrance. She returns in echoes of dark and light, in a truth only the image can yield, the shutter’s eye which sees and tells. The image of Marilyn haunts and flowers from generation to generation. There are not many of her kind. She was born to film, that illusion transforming life into the reality of art.” —Sam Shaw

She seemed to have a kind of unconscious glow about her physical self that was innocent, like a child. When she posed nude, it was ‘Gee, I arn kind of, you know, sort of dishy,’ like she enjoyed it without being egotistical.” —Elizabeth Taylor

”She’s scared and unsure of herself. I found myself wishing that I were a psychoanalyst and she were my patient. It might be that I couldn’t have helped her, but she would have looked lovelv on a couch. “ Billy Wilder

”When you look at Marilyn on the screen, you don’t want anything bad to happen to her. You really care that she should be all right…happy.” —Natalie Wood

”I never worked with Marilyn Monroe, but if she’d lived, I think she would have been all right. She would have been President of the United States. “ —Walter Matthau

”She was not the usual movie idol. There was something democratic about her. She was the type who would join in and wash up the supper dishes even if you didn’t ask her.” —Carl Sandburg

”Marilyn was an incredible person to act with…the most marvelous I ever worked with, and I have been working for 29 years.” —Montgomery Clift

”When she’s there, she’s there. All of her is there! She’s there to work. “—Clark Gable

”Still she hangs like a bat in the heads of the men who met her, and none of us will ever forget her. “— Sammy Davis, Jr.

”Marilyn’s need to be desired was so great that she could make love to a camera. Because of this, her lust aroused lust in audiences, sometimes even among women. There was nothing subtle about it. She was no tease. She was prepared, and even eager, to give what she offered. “ —William Manchester

”Do you remember when Marilyn Monroe died? Everybody stopped work, and you could see all that day the same expressions on their faces, the same thought: ‘How can a girl with success, fame, youth, money, beauty … how could she kill herself?’ Nobody could understand it because those are the things that everybody wants, and they can’t believe that life wasn’t important to Marilyn Monroe, or that her life was elsewhere. “ —Marlon Brando

”It may sound peculiar to say so, because she is no longer with us, but we were very close. Once when we were doing that picture together, I got a call on the set: my younger daughter had had a fall. I ran home and the one person to call was Marilyn. She did an awful lot to boost things up for movies when everything was at a low state; there’ll never be anyone like her for looks, for attitude, for all of it. “— Betty Grable

Norma Jeane Baker / Marilyn Monroe ( June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962 )

(Source: missavagardner, via babyjanehudsonbeauty)